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Joined: 22 Sep 2008
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Weaving Scales

by Littlewing

22 Sep 2008
Views: 9145

In this lesson, I am going to assume that you already know most of the scales we talk about in this lesson.

Now lets put that off to the side for second and ponder this question: What is a scale?
A tool that you weight yourself on? NO. A scale is a sequence of tones built off of a root note. That is the basis for all knowledge of scales and modes.

Within scales, we have a distance between tones known as INTERVALS. Assuming that you already understand the concept of intervals we will move on.

The major scale has 7 modes: Ionian, Dorian, Phyrigian, Lydian, Mixolydian, Aeolian and Locrian.
Most people will never step outside the major scale and its modes. NOTE: PENTATONICS DO NOT COUNT AS SCALES. THEY ARE JUST TONES THAT ARE DERIVED FROM THE AEOLIAN AND IONIAN MODE.

When Soloing, you should do what's called WEAVING SCALES. This is how it works.
I can be soloing in a D aeolian scale which is a relative mode of F major(Ionian). I'm just standing there, throwing in my bends, vibratos, sweeps, etc. Eventually, the solo begins to get tedious. What do I do? I throw in a outside scale. Keep soloing in D Aeolian but eventually, start to solo in D dorian which is a relative mode of C major which is 5th from F major. Then the D dorian solo starts getting boring. Now, I throw in a D harmonic minor. That natural 7 is such a change in the scale that it makes the solo much more interesting. What happens? Your ear adjusts to it. See what happens? Your ear adjusts to the outside tones. To prevent this from happening, I should of soloed in all 3 of those scales AT THE SAME TIME. This adds color to your soloing. An old saying is "I can play what ever I want in the middle, as long as I start and land on the right note.". Your probably thinking "What the hell? I can solo in A major and play a Bb whole tone?". The answer is YES. While this is technically incorrect, it prevents your solo from becoming boring. BUT DON'T, AND I REPEAT DONT' OVERUSE THIS TECHNIQUE. While this can create some extremely cool soloing, it can sound very dissonant if used improperly. When I say throw it in, I mean throw it in. But if you want to use something like a A aeolian and an A Dorian, then that won't kill you and you can use that as much as you want. That concludes Weaving Scales.



Comments:

01
09.23.2008
  mattmurray

So basically you're telling people to solo using a bunch of random scales but with the same root note? Isn't one of the advantages to using a scale for a solo so that it has continuity throughout?

I don't mean to sound like a dick, but do you have an example of this technique?

I think by telling beginner guitarists this, you're sending them a step backwards. But I could be totally wrong! I'll give it a try.

02
09.23.2008
  Littlewing

Not exactly. If I gave that impression, then I am sorry, but what I meant was that sometimes you can throw in a scale outside of the key to add tone colors to your solo.

P.S.When I said the A major, Bb whole tone thing, I might have been exaggerating :.

Its always good to think outside the box, such as throwing in a D Dorian with a D Aeolian.

03
09.26.2008
  guitarmastergod

so... are you saying that you can combine all these scales or do you switch from d dorian to d aeolian

04
09.27.2008
  JazzMaverick

D Dorian is a minor mode, it can sound good when improvising to change into another one of the minor modes, but not completely - if the song is in Dorian, make sure you emphasise that.

05
10.03.2008
  macandkanga

If you are soloing a capella (no instrumental accompaniment) it's much easier to pull it off and it sound good. Other than that it depends on the chord progression your soloing to.

06
10.05.2008
  guitarmastergod

i know there modes, i asked a question

07
10.05.2008
  JazzMaverick

Yeah, I was trying to answer your question.

Basically, if you're playing in the same song, and not intending to have a key change then you canít really play D Dorian and switch to D Aeolian.

Although, if you're soloing, it could sound pretty cool, but it depends on what the key is, e.g. If you're in the key of C and you're using D Dorian, it sounds cool using other modes, but make sure you emphasise that it's actually Dorian, rather than Aeolian. If you get me. Because otherwise it'll create a different key.

This is all theoretical, it's totally up to you what you do with your own music, if it sounds good, go for it.

08
10.20.2008
  Littlewing

Pretty much. You dont want it to sound like its in a different key or it'll clash with the harmonic progression.

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